Poetry Prompt #9

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Poetry Prompt#9

I’ve gone for something simple this week…it will be interesting to see what you make of these two circles. I’ve been receiving some wonderful submissions in response to the weekly poetry prompts. Thanks to everyone who has embraced this creative exercise so enthusiastically. Please keep your poems coming in. If you’ve missed a prompt, you can catch up any time. Send your poems to traffa-m@bigpond.net.au as a Word document attachment and add a personal note about why or how you chose to write this particular poem. Happy writing! Teena

 

Poem of the Day

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Pelican Manners

By Nadine Cranenburgh

Get in line
wait your turn
The early bird gets the
worm, or in this case, the fish
Schools play hide and seek
underwater, as well as
on land, and I was
first, so I am ‘it’.
Get in line, wait
your turn, or I
might eat you
instead=

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #7

Prompt7

Nadine says: I imagined the sort of conversation that might happen in that situation – although the pictured pelicans look very well-mannered.

Poem of the Day

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Blueberry

by Sally Odgers

 

blueberry bluetongue

green grass green

sunshine sunshine

polish me

glow me

sinuous slithering

not-snake-just-me

blueberry bluetongue

secrecy

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #8

Prompt8

Sally says: Written because I almost never write free verse. I was trying to rhyme and scan throughout.

 

Poem of the Day

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Manatee Anarchy

By Bill Condon

 

There was once a well-mannered manatee,

who rarely indulged in profanity.

But when confronted with queues,

she blew every fuse

and swore with manic insanity.

 

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #7

Prompt7

 

 

 

Poem of the Day

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Line Crime

by Dianne Bates

I’m sick of waiting for the bathroom
with Sister Susie taking her time
Preening herself while I’m busting to go —
that has to be a crime.

If Francis Drake had to wait in a bathroom queue
instead of setting sail on the sea,
he might not be known at all today
simply because of a pee.

 

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #7

Prompt7

Poem of the Day

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A Zooish Riddle

by Monty Edwards

 

Today I’m all excited ’cause we’re going to the zoo

And there’s something that we’ll see there that I’ll now describe to you.

Since it’s found throughout Australia you would hardly call it rare –

Live for long in any city and you’ll surely find one there.

 

Not so common in the country, but you still may see a few,

It’s no cuddly koala nor a bounding kangaroo.

Do not think of an echidna or a little bandicoot

This is something that you’ll never ever hear described as cute.

 

In appearance, on occasions, it’s been likened to a snake,

But it’s certainly not legless in the moves that it can make.

If you see a very large one, you will wish it wasn’t so,

Should it move along quite slowly, you may even see it grow!

 

You can rule out any reptile, bird or fish that comes to mind,

But I will not tease you further, that would really be unkind.

It’s a line. No, not a lion. There, I’ve given you a clue.

It’s a line of ticket buyers gaining entry through a queue!

 

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #7

Prompt7

Author comment: I found the array of spellings used to convey the final sound of “queue” quite remarkable and used several. Among them, the zoo provided a useful context for the poem, as aside from rhyming with the key word, the zoo is a familiar and positive experience for most children. Describing the queue as if an unnamed exhibit seemed a good way of arousing curiosity without compromising truth on the way to a surprise conclusion.

Poetry Prompt #8

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Forget rhyme and let the words flow freely in response to this week’s Poetry Prompt. This gorgeous creature makes itself at home in my garden and allows me to enjoy the occasional close encounter. It’s a youngster and I haven’t seen Mama about for a while. Are you inspired already? I hope so. Don’t forget, if you’ve missed one of our Monday prompts, you can catch up at any time. Send your submissions to traffa-m@bigpond.net.au as a Word document attachment and add a personal note about why or how you chose to write this particular poem. Happy writing! TeenaPrompt8

Poem of the Day

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Words and Birds

by Virginia Lowe

 

A queue of curious pelicans

A cue of queueious pelicans

The English language

Never ceases

To amaze

And amuse

 

Mother counted sixty four

swans and pelicans

on Lake Colac once

when I was a child

in the days

when the lake

was full

before

climate

change

hit.

 

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #7

Prompt7

Virginia says: I wrote this poem for exactly the reasons given in the poem. The memory, and amusement at ‘curious’ and ‘queue’.

 

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Pelicans

by Bridh Hancock

 

I have often seen these fine big birds,

Above the waves or in the sky,

Lords of the shores and the upper air.

They certainly know their worth, they do,

These fishers who seek a beak-full of fish.

 

They don’t say much, as I can tell,

But fisher-folk know them very well

As exceedingly skilful and persistent.

Oh yes, they know their worth, alright,

These seekers of stealth with a fondness for fish.

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #7

Prompt7

 

 

Poem of the Day

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Behind the scenes

by Jenny Erlanger

 

We cannot see or hear them,

yet we know when each arrives.

We love them, hate or fear them

as we stumble through our lives.

 

They fire away like crazy

somewhere deep inside our brain.

They prod us when we’re lazy,

get us back on track again.

 

They don’t ask for permission

from the moment that we wake

to set out on their mission

to control the moves we make.

 

It may not live an hour

as its life is pretty short

but there’s no denying the power

of a solitary thought.

 

  •  Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #6

Poetry Prompt 6

Jenny says: I have always been fascinated by the capacity of a seemingly immaterial thought to create physical or emotional responses in human beings.