Poem of the Day

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INSIDE/OUTSIDE

 

I have a cat and she lives inside;

Inside the house, where she grows quite fat.

BUT often that fat cat wants to go outside;

Outside the house to hunt for a rat.

 

Inside, outside, inside, outside –

Cat at the window goes meow, meow, meow.

Inside, outside, inside, outside;

Make up your mind, cat, right away, NOW!

 

I have a dog and he lives outside;

Outside the house where he stays on guard.

BUT often that guard dog wants to come inside,

Inside the house and away from his yard.

 

Inside, outside, inside, outside –

Dog at the door going howl, howl, howl.

Inside, outside, inside, outside;

Make up your mind, dog, right away, NOW!

 

Jaz Stutley

 

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #30

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TRAVELLING

 

I find travelling a mystery,

‘specially if I fall asleep.

First I was there, now I am here.

How can that be?

 

All it takes is time passing –

plus a bus, a tram, a train,

a boat, a car, a plane.

Then I am where I wasn’t before.

 

It’s a riddle I hope never

to solve. Even more than

travelling from city to bush,

bush to sea: I like the mystery.

 

Jaz Stutley
  •  Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #23

 

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A Plea for Green

 

Green are the hills for children:

a sunlit place of grasses,

dandelions and daisies;

 

as green as an apple, a fig,

an unripe fruit; the green

of memory and melody,

 

the scrubby bushy slopes

for exploration; tall trees

to climb, parks to run through.

 

Screens are not green

or sunlit; the blue wild

winds do not blow there –

 

a static buzz bends

the mind in dark rooms.

This is my plea for green.

 

Jaz Stutley

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #22

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GATEWAY

 

This portal

speaks to me of Narnia:

the last book, the last battle.

 

Long before Dr Who,

C.S. Lewis knew, we knew

of the stable bigger on the inside;

 

though that door was rough and wooden,

a portal can disguise itself

as a gate in a lichened stone wall.

 

But enter at your peril.

The Irish faery folk haunt castles

and barrows, and mortal souls

 

can wander their land for a day; returning

to find it is seven years or seventy.

And Narnia was a faery place.

 

Look, admire, beware; walk through –

only if you desire to be bewitched,

craving the adventure of your life.

 

Jaz Stutley

 

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #21

Poem of the Day

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River Run

 

Run river run:

sIlver over stones

riVer sobs and moans;

briEf gleam in the sun:

riveR run and run.

 

 

Run River run

rapId to the seas;

riVer leap with ease,

tEasing just for fun:

River run and run.

Jaz Stutley

 

  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #19

 

 

Poem of the Day

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Today’s poem was the winner of the 13th Kathleen Julia Bates Memorial Writing Competition.
ROAR

 

I stood at the glass barrier,

looking in.

One lion, facing away,

gnawed at a raw bone in the grass;

one lion stood

on the prow of the hill,

looking out.

 

This one was not cowed –

his maw opened

and his roar filled my ears

with a storm over sea,

with the wind on the plains,

with a rolling thunder

deep and wise and proud.

 

I shivered at the sound,

and I wondered

which of us

was the prisoner.

 Jaz Stutley