“Feet” by Robyn Youl

2 Comments

Quatrain Poetry celebrates the number four. It is easy and fun to write:

A Quatrain poem is a four-line poem that rhymes.

There are four ways to organise a Quatrain rhyming scheme.

1. a/b/a/b/ rhyming scheme
2. a/a/b/b/ rhyming scheme
3. a/a/b/a/ rhyming scheme
4. a/b/c/b/ rhyming scheme
1. Cat Feet are neat & round. They need less energy to lift during movement. They grip on rough terrain. They are paws for endurance, not short bursts of speed.

Cat Feet: Rhyming scheme: a/b/a/b/ Four lines

 

Not for speed, not for the race

Not for the swift or fleet

Steady the rhythm, steady the pace

Arched and round cat feet.

 

2 .Hare Feet require more energy for locomotion, but are designed for speed. The two centre toes are longer than the outside toes and the toes arch less. Designed for running with short, high bursts of speed.

Hare Feet: Rhyming scheme: a/a/b/b/ Four lines

 

Two centre toes, long and strong

Grip the ground, speed me along

Race with me if you dare

Mine is the fleet foot of the hare

 

3. Webbed Feet are for swimming to retrieve birds or drag fishing nets ashore. The toes are connected by membrane similar to that of a frog to assist with locomotion in water. 

Webbed Feet: Rhyming Scheme: a/a/b/a/ Four lines.

 

Bred to swim, bred to achieve

Webbed feet through the water cleave

Downed birds and fishing nets I carry

My goal in life is to retrieve

2 thoughts on ““Feet” by Robyn Youl

  1. Excellent Robyn – just the kind of poetry I wish there was more of. It’s beautifully written, informative and fun. Love it. Please share more. You show how poetry can be used to create interest and tell a story while it demonstrates itself as a special language. More please.

  2. Wonderful idea, Robyn. You have imparted information about nature and entertained and taught about the structure of language – all in a series of lovely little verses. Congratulations. This is a splendid example of how poetry can enrich a child’s mind and leave it open to engaging with the wonders of language. More please.

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