“Shine Moon” by Andrew Carter

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Shine Moon

 

Rats race to the moon for the biggest piece of cheese

Fat rats fly on upward on a perilous lunar mission

Flying on rocketing clouds their tails stiff in the breeze

They no not what will come of their loony decision.

 

Earths plagued by starving rats begging food to eat

A fragile globe is spoiledkilled for meat of beasts.

Ratus ratus moves to the moon in a rocket ship fleet

Hoping science will provide more than cheese for feasts.

​​​​

Only one man lives on the moonone Mister Scribbly Dibbler

He plays a mystery moony tune – on a silvery harmonica

Snorts some moonshine whiskey; what a rhymey riddler

His origins remembered from forbears in Thessalonica.

 

Mr Scribble scribbles a riddle deep inside a crater

Isn’t science fun? Will we see you later?

“Moon Theory” by Louise McCarthy

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Moon Theory

 

Before I’d heard,

Before I knew,

That the moon was far away –

Too far to get to in one day,

“Impossible!” I heard you say –

I had thought,

Before I knew –

(I was ready to explore)

That I would fetch a piece of moon,

And keep it to adore.

You see I’d noticed, very often,

Or at least I’d understood,

Others must have done the same,

And so I thought I could –

Piece by piece they’d take it down,

Then build it up again,

Then take it down and build it up –

Again and again and again.

 

 

“Moon-talk” by Katherine Gallagher

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Moon-talk

 

 

 

Moon, creamy white stone,

 

precious . . . Stick with the legends –

 

better at a distance.

 

 

My litany could go on –

 

I don’t want to visit,

 

take a machine-ride against gravity

 

brain-open.

 

 

But if I change my mind

 

Moon won’t have any

 

say in it.

 

 

 

©Katherine Gallagher

 

(Published in The Eye’s Circle, Rigmarole Press)

“Moon Zoom” by J.R.Poulter with Teacher Notes

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Moon Zoom

There’s the Moon,
Way up high,
Over the rooftops,
Up in the sky!
Oh, my!
Here’s the Moon
And someone’s there!
An astronaut
Shot through the air,
He dared!
Do YOU want to know
About outer-Space?
Would you like to go
To that far-away place?
Space ace!
Science will show you
Where, why, how,
Scientists will
Create the ‘wow!’
Learn now!
Teacher Notes & Activities
Search out the answers to a fun space quiz to test you knowledge about space travel and the daily life of an astronaut.
1. What was ‘Sputnik’?
2. What was the date of the first Moon Mission?
3. Who was the first man to walk on the moon?
4. Did the astronauts on that Moon landing leave anything behind on the moon?
5. There are photos of astronauts floating around the cabin of the spacecraft. Why do they float?
6. Find a definition for ‘zero gravity’ – then describe it in your own words.
7. What did the astronauts eat and drink whilst travelling on their journey to the Moon and back?
8. How many missions were there to the Moon?
9. Who were the astronauts on the first Moon landing mission?
10. Who was the first woman to go into outer-space?
Activity: Build a model of the solar system in class.
Activity: Find pictures that illustrate space stories, poems, fantasies –
Moon, ‘Man in the Moon’
Stars
Sun
Image from an old children’s book of rhymes –
Moon poems by kids

“Looking at the Moon through Binoculars” by Vanessa Proctor

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Looking at the Moon through Binoculars

 

Perfectly round

the moon comes into focus,

luminous, haloed,

almost close enough to touch.

In this lunar landscape

there are mountains, craters

highlands and valleys,

the Sea of Tranquility,

the Ocean of Storms.

Three days’ journey

catapulted through

the blackness of space

past comets, stars

and satellites to reach

my destination.

I’d land on the bright side

of the moon,

my boots sinking into

silvery dust, soft like snow,

I’d jump over moon rocks,

check for signs of life,

then I’d turn to face the earth,

blue and green and beautiful

and I would wave.

“Upside-down Moon-face” by Celia Berrell

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Upside-down Moon-face

 

Serenitatis and

Imbrium Mares

are names for the eyes

of the “Man” up there.

 

Asteroid impacts

made volcanoes blow,

so Moon’s molten lava

began to flow.

 

These large lunar seas

then cooled, hard and black,

so the full-Moon has patches

for eyes that stare back.

 

Cognitum and

Nubrium Mares

make his grin.

But he’s upside down

when WE look at him!

 

Inspired by this article:

https://www.space.com/2036-origins-man-moon.html

The Origins Of The Man In The Moon

By Ker Than February 09, 2006 Science & Astronomy 

An image of the moon taken by Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong in July of 1969.

(Image: © NASA)

The “Man in the Moon” illusion, familiar to various cultures around the world, was created by powerful asteroid impacts that rocked the satellite billions of years ago, a new study suggests.

The study, performed by Laramie Potts and Ralph von Frese of Ohio State University, reveals that ancient lunar impacts played a much larger role in shaping the Moon’s surface than scientists had previously thought. It may also help explain the origins of two mysterious bulges on the Moon’s surface.

The new analysis reveal that shock waves from some of the Moon’s early asteroid impacts traveled through the lunar interior, triggering volcanic eruptions on the Moon’s opposite side. Molten magma spewed out from the deep interior and flooded the lunar landscape.

When the magma cooled, it created dark patches on the Moon called “lunar maria” or “lunar seas.”

During a full Moon, some of these patches combine to form what looks like a grinning human face, commonly known as the “Man in the Moon.” The man’s eyes are the Mare Imbrium and Mare Serenitatis, its nose is the Sinus Aestuum and its grinning mouth is the Mare Nubium and Mare Cognitum.

The effects of some of those traveling shock waves are still visible in the Moon’s interior today. Cross-sectional images of the insides reveal that a part of the mantle, the section between the Moon’s core and crust, still juts into its core today, 700 miles below the point of one of the impacts. The images were created from data collected by NASA’s Clementine and Lunar Prospector satellites.

Mysterious bulges

Early surveys by the Apollo missions revealed that the moon isn’t a perfect sphere. There is a bulge on the Earth-facing side, called the near side, and another bulge on the far side.

According to one hypothesis, these bulges are the result of Earth’s gravity tugging on the Moon during the early years following its cataclysmic formation, when its surface was still molten and malleable.

The current study suggests that this scenario is only partly correct. The researchers think the Moon was struck by at least two very powerful asteroid impacts in its past (in addition to countless smaller impacts that left smaller craters easily identifiable still today). One of the major impacts struck the near side, sending shock waves that traveled through the lunar interior to create the bulge on the far side; the other impact struck the far side and created the bulge on the side.

The researchers think the impacts happened about four billion years ago. At that time, roughly half a billion years after the birth of the solar system, the Moon was still geologically active and its core and mantle were still molten and malleable.

Back then, the Moon was much closer to the Earth than it is today and the gravitational interactions between the two were much stronger. The researchers think that when magma spilled out of the Moon’s interior, Earth’s gravity immediately grabbed hold and hasn’t let go since.

“This research shows that even after the collisions happened, the Earth had a profound effect on the Moon,” Potts said.

The findings were detailed in a recent issue of the journal Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors.

 

 

 

“Polly Rules” by Julie Cahill

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Polly Puss sat on the fence

sailing with his fate

Until the day the farmer opened up the farmyard gate

The sheep went out

the cows came in

which left Puss quite bemused

addressing those then left to listen

before access was closed

Alpca stretched their long necks longer

their ears pricked to his chatter

‘It matters that the sheep were led;

that cows made all that clatter

This fence is the dividing line

thin as this here whisker’

Pussy plucked to prove his point

which drew a nasty blister

‘But anyway, I rule the roost

from here, this narrow line

So just stay put you woolley herd

alpacas will be fine

You know, the gate was opened

so the tractor could pass through

Those beasts weren’t meant to cross the fence

The system’s gone askew

The grass is never greener

on the other side, you see

Those sheep and cows will end up

on the farmer’s plate for tea.’